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MANAGED FUTURES
What are Managed Futures?

Managed futures are an asset class in their own right, separate from traditional investments such as stocks and bonds.

The term managed futures describes an industry comprised of professional money managers known as commodity trading advisors (CTAs). These trading advisors manage client assets on a discretionary basis using global futures markets as an investment medium. Trading advisors take positions based on expected profit potential.

By their very nature, managed futures provide a diversified investment opportunity. Trading advisors can participate in more than 150 global markets; from grains and gold to currencies and stock indices. Many funds further diversify by using several trading advisors with different trading approaches. In this example, the overall risk is reduced by almost 82 percent from –41.0 percent to –7.5 percent and the return also increases almost 20 percent from +7.4 percent to +8.9 percent. This is mainly due to the lack of correlation and, in some cases, negative correlation between some of the portfolio components in the diversified portfolio. There is even negative correlation between stocks and managed futures as the two markets move independently from each other.
COMPARISON OF A STOCKS ONLY VS. DIVERSIFIED PORTFOLIO
ANNUAL RETURNS AND
MAX. DRAWDOWNS
Managed futures: CASAM CISDM CTA Equal Weighted; Bonds: JP Morgan Government Bond Global; Source: Bloomberg

The main benefit of adding managed futures to a balanced portfolio is the potential to decrease portfolio volatility. Risk reduction is possible because managed futures can trade across a wide range of global markets that have virtually no long-term correlation to most traditional asset classes. Moreover, managed futures funds generally perform well during adverse economic or market conditions for stocks and bonds, thereby providing excellent downside protection in most portfolios.

While managed futures can decrease portfolio risk, they can also simultaneously enhance overall portfolio performance. The following chart illustrates that adding managed futures to a traditional portfolio improves overall investment quality while also potentially reducing risk.

This has been substantiated by an extensive bank of academic research, beginning with the landmark study by Dr. John Lintner of Harvard University in which he wrote: “… the combined portfolios of stocks (or stocks and bonds) after including judicious investments … in leveraged managed futures accounts show substantially less risk at every possible level of expected return than portfolios of stocks (or stocks and bonds) alone.”

OPTIMUM PORTFOLIO MIX (01/1987 - 02/2008)*

* 1) Managed Futures: CASAM CISDM CTA Equal Weighted
2) Stocks: MSCI World
3) Bonds: JP Morgan Government Bond Global
Source: Bloomberg

Including up to 20 percent of total investments in Managed Futures
funds enhances portfolio diversity and therefore promotes greater
independence from general market moves

What are Managed Futures?
MANAGED FUTURES VS. A TRADITIONAL PORTFOLIO DUING
STOCK MARKET DECLINES (01/1987 - 02/2008)
Managed futures: CASAM CISDM CTA Equal Weighted; Stocks: MSCI World;
Bonds: JP Morgan Government Bond Global;

Managed futures trading advisors can generate profit in both increasing or decreasing markets due to the their ability to go long (buy) futures positions in anticipation of rising markets or go short (sell) futures positions in anticipation of falling markets. Moreover, trading advisors are able to go long or short with equal ease. This ability, coupled with their virtual non-correlation with most traditional asset classes, have resulted in managed futures funds performing well relative to traditional asset classes during adverse conditions for stocks and bonds.

For example, during periods of hyperinflation, hard commodities such as gold, silver, oil, grains and livestock tend to do well, as do the major world currencies. Conversely, during deflationarytimes, futures provide an opportunity to profit by selling into a declining market with the expectation of buying, or closing out the position, at a lower price. Tradingadvisors can even use strategies employing options on futures contracts that allow for profit potential in flat or neutral markets.

This ability to accommodate and protect against unpredictable events can be invaluable in today’s volatile global markets.

While managed futures are new to some, banks, corporations and mutual fund managers have used futures markets to manage their exposure to price change for decades. Futures markets make it possible for these companies “to hedge” or transfer their risk to other market participants, including speculators, who assume this risk in anticipation of making a profit.

Without speculators, price discovery would only occur when both a producer and an end user want to execute a transaction at the same time. When speculators enter the marketplace, the number of ready buyers and sellers increases and hedgers are able to execute larger orders at their convenience without effecting a dramatic change in price – providing additional liquidity, which helps ensure market integrity. By selling futures when prices are rising and purchasing as prices fall, their activity can have a stabilizing effect in volatile markets.

Looking back over the past few decades, managed futures have consistently outperformed other asset classes such as stocks and bonds. Consider an initial investment of $10,000 invested in 1980. If placed in a U.S. stock fund mirroring the S&P 500, the investment would have been worth approximately $288,000 as of early 2008.

Allocating the same amount to a basket of international equities reflecting the Morgan Stanley Capital International Index of world stocks, the initial investment would have grown to nearly $120,000. But the same investment in managed futures, based on the Center for International Securities and Derivatives Markets weighting, would now be worth more than $513,000.

WHEN CRITICAL EVENTS OCCUR (01/1987 - 02/2008)* Managed futures: CASAM CISDM CTA Equal Weighted; Stocks: MSCI World;
Logarithmic scale; Source: Bloomberg

As the above chart shows, during the stock market crash in 1987, panic hit the stock markets following the largest one-day loss in history. Managed Futures reported above 20 percent returns. Similarly after the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the stock market plummeted 16.3 percent. In contrast, Managed Futures gained 8.3 percent in the same period

COMPARISON OF PERFORMANCE (01/1980 - 02/2008)* * 1) Managed Futures: CASAM CISDM CTA Equal Weighted
2) U.S. Stocks: S&P Total Return
3) International Stocks: MSCI World
Source: Bloomberg
All material is property of MSCI. Use and duplication subject to contract with
MSCI

Over the past 27years, Manged Futures have outperformed almost every other assets class, including high-performing S&P 500 Total Returns

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR MANAGED FUTURES BROKER SERVICES, EMAIL OR CALL US AT 646.248.6180 TO SPEAK WITH A COMMODITY TRADING ADVISOR SPECIALIST. WE'RE HERE TO HELP AND HAPPY TO ANSWER ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE ABOUT MANAGED FUTURES AND ATTAIN'S COMMODITY TRADING ADVISOR SERVICES.
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Commodity trading, managed futures, and other alternative investments are complex and carry a risk of substantial losses. As such, they are not suitable for all investors. Risks also include, but are not limited to, the potential for changing political and/or economic conditions that may substantially affect the price and/or liquidity of a currency. The impact of seasonal and geopolitical events is already factored into market prices. Prices in the underlying cash or physical markets do not necessarily move in tandem with futures and options prices. Past performance is not indicative of future results. Information contained in this correspondence is intended for informational purposes only and was obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Invest only risk capital.
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